A summary of the stanzas of ode to a grecian urn

The urn is an external object capable of producing a story outside the time of its creation, and because of this ability the poet labels it a "sylvan historian" that tells its story through its beauty: The last stanza enters stumbling upon a pun, but its concluding lines are very fine, and make a sort of recovery with their forcible directness.

No real passion is going on; the scenes on the urn are frozen. His song can never end nor the trees ever shed their leaves. The town is desolate and will forever be silent. It depicts three scenes: The questions the narrator asks reveal a yearning to understand the scene, but the urn is too limited to allow such answers.

He wonders who all these people are, and from where they have come. The relationship between the audience with the world is for benefiting or educating, but merely to emphatically connect to the scene.

Line-by-Line Discussion of John Keats’ Ode on a Grecian Urn

The hard edges of classical Greek writing are softened by the enveloping emotion and suggestion. What little town by river or sea-shore, 35 Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel, Is emptied of its folk, this pious morn.

Well, probably to be kissed or more than that. The trouble is that it is a little too true. So more likely this is said by the urn. Here, the speaker tries to imagine what the experience of the figures on the urn must be like; he tries to identify with them.

Happy is the musician forever playing songs forever new. A burning forehead, and a parching tongue. What pipes and timbrels. The youth are always under the trees.

While the five poems display a unity in stanza forms and themes, the unity fails to provide clear evidence of the order in which they were composed. You will see that In this ode, the poet also addresses the things he sees on the urn.

This allows the poet or at least, the speaker in the poem to mull over the strange idea of the human figures carved into the urn. Can there be a more pointed concetto than this address to the Piping Shepherds on a Grecian Urn.

Soon he was writing poetry. The trees will never lose their leaves. What little town by river or sea shore, Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel, Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn. Therefore, the real life is complemented and enriched by this ideal.

Ode on a Grecian Urn Summary In the first stanza, the speaker stands before an ancient Grecian urn and addresses it. But the permanence of art created out of imagination is a complement to the temporary aspect of life.

The figures on the urns could be humans or gods.

Ode on a Grecian Urn

In fact, the Ode on a Grecian Urn may deserve to rank first in the group if viewed in something approaching its true complexity and human wisdom. Each of the three scenes depicted on the urn moves him in a different way, and he describes them in detail, marveling at their artistry.

It is natural for brides to be possessed physically What struggle to escape. The sensual aspects are replaced with an emphasis on the spiritual aspects, and the last scene describes a world contained unto itself.

Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time, The urn is called the "foster-child" of Silence and slow Time. A "foster-child" is a kid who is adopted and raised by people other than his or her own parents. In this case, the urn has been adopted by "Silence" and "slow Time," which, if anything, sounds.

A summary of Ode on a Grecian Urn in John Keats's Keats’s Odes. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Keats’s Odes and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. A summary of Ode on a Grecian Urn in John Keats's Keats’s Odes.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Keats’s Odes and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

In this stanza, the speaker seems to have moved on to another of the pictures on the side of the urn. (We think there are a total of three different scenes depicted on the urn, and this is the second.) As in the first scene, there is music playing.

The music is being played on "pipes," which is. The urn teases him out of thought, as does eternity; that is, the problem of the effect of a work of art on time and life, or simply of what art does, is a perplexing one, as is the effort to grapple with the concept of eternity.

"Ode on a Grecian Urn" is organized into ten-line stanzas, beginning with an ABAB rhyme scheme and ending with a Miltonic sestet (1st and 5th stanzas CDEDCE, 2nd stanza CDECED, and 3rd and 4th stanzas CDECDE).

A summary of the stanzas of ode to a grecian urn
Rated 0/5 based on 14 review
Analysis of Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats